Diabetes Innovation: The Secret Sauce

BEOften, when we think about innovation, we immediately think of hi-tech devices, software or platforms.

In the midst of this year’s Diabetes Innovation conference, and even acknowledging that many people with diabetes are joined at the hip (literally) to some pretty hi-tech tools, it is worth slowing down for a moment to consider the value and efficacy of decidedly low-tech solutions.

Earlier this year, Susannah Fox (a speaker at this year’s conference) coauthored a report published by the Pew Research Center entitled Tracking for Health. This report collects survey data showing that while 60% of U.S adults track diet or exercise, and 33% track their own health — 49% track only in their heads, 34% use paper and only 21% use technology (web, app, device) for personal tracking.

People with diabetes are certainly well-represented among the 33% of the population who are self-identified health care self-trackers — but remember, most self-trackers are decidedly low-tech. [Read more…]

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Nicholas Christakis on Diabetes Innovation

Behavioral contagion and the prevention of disease: Nicholas Christakis is interested in offline social networks (vs. online social networks) and the ways in which behaviors can be tracked across populations … and the ways in which behaviors – if understood – may be modified.

Nicholas Christakis on Diabetes Innovation

Diabetes Innovation 2013

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